Category Archives: Buddhism

What’s New For June?


First up, a jam-packed Tibetan Lu Jong Workshop in NYC.


WHEN: Saturday, June 24th

WHERE: Three Jewels NYC ~ 61 4TH AVE, 3rd FL

TIME: 1:00 to 3:30pm

FEE: $30 early bird ends June 21 | $35 after June 21


How do I register? CLICK HERE





  • The Five Elements movements (for opening the spine and general balancing)
  • The Five Body Parts movements (for the musculoskeletal system)
  • The Five Vital Organ movements (for improving function of the kidneys, heart, lungs, spleen, and liver)
  • How to work with the Breath and the Subtle Body
  • Principles of Tibetan Medicine and the Five Elements world view
  • Why it is important to nurture the subtle body and release blockages


How do I register? CLICK HERE

I look forward to seeing you there!


Yes, it’s been a while since my last post, but the absence has not been without purpose.

I deepened my Lu Jong studies with the exploration of more vigorous poses, adding an entirely NEW level of movements to the Lu Jong core practice. These movements are the next level of training for students comfortable with Lu Jong Level I.

I’ve been working on yoga workshops and retreats, in addition to Lu Jong Teacher trainings, drawing upon all my skills and knowledge to create purposeful and fun experiences in different locales. Oh my!

In addition, I’m preparing to launch an exciting and dynamic practice: Tog Chod – The Dance of the Wisdom Sword. I mean c’mon, who can resist learning how to work with a sword?

More information about this incredible Tibetan Martial Art and the chance to take exclusive classes will come very soon!


Lu Jong: Tibetan Tantric Yoga




Tibetan tantric yoga, laid down by the tantric tradition of master Pundit Naropa and Lama Marpa Lotsawa, is a practice that has been done by Indian and Tibetan yogis for centuries.
It is not like the normal yoga practiced in the West.

It is a practice of rLung (psychic wind), joined with mental exercise and visualization of the channels and chakras, and is based on spiritual and mental development.

This is what is known as the practice of Lu Jong.

Through physical positions and movements, the yoga exercises remove the negative energies from the channels and chakras, harmonize the subtle wind and release the inner stress and tension.

Lu Jong basically helps stimulate channels and chakras, tames the mind and gives spiritual experience.

Click  HERE  to explore and feel how Lu Jong can benefit YOUR body and mind with a special workshop at Tibet House US (NYC) on March 18th, 2017.


Pre-Register and use code  LJNYTHUS  for a 10% discount!


An Introduction to Tibetan Lu Jong: The Five Elements Movements at Joshua’s Place, Southampton NY


~  LU JONG ~





Lu Jong is an ancient Tibetan movement practice (yoga) developed for the purpose of self-healing.

Movements are combined with rhythmic breathing to bring balance to body and mind.

Physically it gently works the entire body with a primary focus on the flexibility of the spine.

Mentally it compels you to ‘feel’ inside and to be present much like meditation.

The moves are simple yet powerful with all people able to practice at their level of ability.

Wear comfortable clothing for the class  ~ Yoga mats available or bring your own


When:  Sunday March 19th

Where: Joshua’s Place, Southampton NY

Time:   11:00a.m. – 12:00 noon

Cost:    $15.00/ $20 Same Day


Instructor: Joelle Kelly

Certified Lu Jong Instructor & Educator

For many years a direct student of Tulku Lobsang Rinpoche, the lineage holder of this practice, Joelle Kelly was chosen as one of the first teachers certified to teach Lu Jong in North America.

She has since been selected by the Master as one of only two teachers in North America qualified to teach all levels of Lu Jong in addition to the training of future certified Lu Jong Teachers.

Charismatic, warm and joyfully grounded Joelle is committed to meeting each student at their level of comfort and ability.

Lu Jong is shared with great enthusiasm, honor and respect for the wisdom it contains.


For more information contact:

Finding Balance When Times Feel Rocky


The Year of the Fire Rooster launched at full speed and most people forgot to fasten their seat belts!
The ability to create stability in the midst of chaos is increasingly more and more essential to your health – both inside and out.

One of the main benefits of Lu Jong training is precisely this ability to recalibrate the subtle inner energy (lung, chi, prana) thus fortifying the ability to ‘ride the waves’ from a place of grounded power.

When you restore inner balance you generate a sense of calm focus in addition to gently working your body.

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Wouldn’t it make sense to invest in your wellbeing by exploring what Lu Jong can do for YOU?


ALSO … Check out this clip on my teacher, Tibetan Buddhist Tantrayana master, Tulku Lobsang, on Nat Geo’s TV series The Story of God with Morgan Freeman demonstrating the Tibetan practice of Tummo.

Tulku Lobsang will offer an opportunity to study this practice with him when he visits North America in October, 2017!

Posture & Meditation



The basic method for taming our hyperactive mind is to bring our awareness to the body and breath. When we do this, we notice that the state of our body and breathing affect our mental state and that our mental state affects our body and breathing.

This is why posture is important in meditation.

The seven point meditation posture, also known as the Seven Points of Vairocana, is commonly practiced to achieve balance in mind and body through the sitting posture. If the position of the body is correct, it will calm an agitated mind, cheer up an unhappy mind, and produce clarity in an overwhelmed mind.

– The First of the seven points of posture is to sit down, to sit on some kind of cushion. If you are flexible, you can sit in the vajra posture, which is usually known in the West as the lotus posture. But if you’re not that flexible, or you find this posture uncomfortable, or you can’t sit cross-legged at all, and you need to sit in a chair, don’t worry about it. Don’t feel that it will harm or inhibit your meditation to sit in a chair.


– The Second point is to place your hands evenly. This is referring to the left hand being placed palm up in your lap and the right hand is placed palm up in the left. But it can also be understood as keeping our hands at the same height, such as placing them on your knees.


– The Third point of posture is that your spine be straight. This is quite important because by keeping our back straight, we straighten out the subtle channels within our body through which our subtle winds or energies flow. This will allow our mind to relax naturally and become calm.

– The Fourth point is that the shoulders be pushed back a little bit. Here the shoulders are really just an example. It means that all parts of our body are held in a proper and wakeful posture, so that they are relaxed, but not so relaxed that the posture becomes sloppy.


– The Fifth point is that your chin is brought back in and down. This should happen naturally by straightening your back.

– The Sixth is to touch your tongue to the palate.

– The Seventh and final point of posture is the gaze, which is what we do with our eyes. This is important because our thoughts tend to follow our gaze, or our eyes. We should be relaxed looking into space, at nothing in particular, somewhere about 16 fingers width in front of the nose.meditation-posture-drawing

Although it may be hard for beginners to get used to this classical Buddhist meditation posture, the rewards of a few sessions help the mind find peace, strength and control. It also benefits the physical body by bringing its energies into balance.


TIBETAN MEDICINE ~ A Lu Jong New York Learning Series – Part 3


CONTINUING with our exploration of Tibetan Medicine …

When I teach LU JONG I explain the practice has its origins in the merging of three sources of wisdom: Tibetan Medicine, Bon, and Tibetan Buddhism.
I get many questions about Tibetan Medicine so why not, in the spirit of ‘Back to School’, take a brief look at what some of this is all about?

***Before we proceed any further I would like to clarify that I am NOT a doctor of Tibetan Medicine, nor do I diagnose and/or treat people in this area of expertise.My knowledge comes from what I have learned from my teacher and Root Lama, the venerable Tulku Lobsang Rinpoche, who IS a doctor of Tibetan Medicine in addition to being a high Tantrayana Buddhist master.



Having briefly touched upon how the Mind is the ‘behind the scenes’ power for the Body to exist, we move into the realm of the Three Humors as they are the basis of the theory and practice of Tibetan Medicine.

The humors are the vital substances of the body responsible for all bodily functions. They rule physiology, anatomy and morphology, regulate the functioning of the body, its organs, the brain, nerves, bones, blood circulation, lymphatic systems, digestion etc. The three humors also produce the temperament and quality of a person’s body and mind. In effect, they weave together the physical and subtle levels of the Body.



The Three HumorsLung (Wind), Tripa (Bile) and Beken (Phlegm) carry both subtle and physical energies in and out of the body from birth to the end of life. They are also inherently delicate by nature and thus can easily become unbalanced. All diseases are described in terms of an imbalance of one or more of the humors.

Since the three humors are an integral part of our bodies, in Tibetan Medicine, it is said that we carry the seeds of disease within us. As soon as there is a cause and a condition, the unmanifested disease will become apparent.

Taking this one step further … each humor is also linked to one of three mental poisons. When Tripa (Bile) is out of balance it causes anger, unbalanced Lung (Wind) causes attachment or grasping, and unbalanced Beken (Phlegm) creates delusion or ignorance. It is precisely this association that creates the link between imbalances of the mind/emotions and those of the body.

For example, if someone is always angry (bile), no matter what is done to treat the liver (gallbladder), if the anger is not addressed as well the liver will continue to ail. Healing the Body also means Healing the Mind.

In sum … Balanced humors give positive health and harmony to the body/mind, and provide a good base for the development of the immune system. On the contrary, the loss of balance among the humors causes energy disharmony, either physical and/or mental disequilibrium, which may appear at any time and become the cause of diseases.

************* In the next installment we take a closer look at each of the three humors.


TIBETAN MEDICINE ~ A Lu Jong New York Learning Series – Part 2


CONTINUING with our exploration of Tibetan Medicine …

When I teach LU JONG I explain the practice has its origins in the merging of three sources of wisdom: Tibetan Medicine, Bon, and Tibetan Buddhism.
I get many questions about Tibetan Medicine so why not, in the spirit of ‘Back to School’, take a brief look at what some of this is all about?
**Before we proceed any further I would like to clarify that I am NOT a doctor of Tibetan Medicine, nor do I diagnose and/or treat people in this area of expertise.

My knowledge comes from what I have learned from my teacher and Root Lama, the venerable Tulku Lobsang Rinpoche, who IS a doctor of Tibetan Medicine in addition to being a high Tantrayana Buddhist master.


The Tibetan Medical system is a body/mind medicine where the mind is considered to play an essential role in physical health. The mind creates good health and is also the cause of disease.

How can this be possible?  Let’s start by looking at The Mind, The Humors and then The Body.


Unlike Western Medicine, all oriental sciences place their foundations at the level of the mind because the mind is considered to be the Core of everything.
The Natural Mind is the Materia Prima – the  creator of the ‘self’ as well as of the external world as we perceive it.  It is considered to be boundless and without beginning.

The mind is accompanied by an energy which contains the energetic principles of the five elements (earth, water, fire, wind and space). This energy is called the ‘Vehicle of the Mind’.
The elemental process of creation has a specific order originating from the Natural Mind through to completion of the physical Body:


Space > Wind > Fire > Water > Earth (from lightest to heaviest element)

The energetic principles of the five elements also qualify HOW we view the world around us. Their immediate effect is that of illusion, the inability to see things clearly by virtue of our emotions or mental faculties. This disconnect from the original pure state of the Natural Mind is considered to be the Root of the Disease.


There are three qualities that are like ‘poison’ to the mind:

Attachment – Desire and attachment are the principal causes of happiness and sorrow. Attachment creates a temporary pleasure which inevitably leads to jealousy, dissatisfaction, loss, and creates an imbalance in the heart, lungs, colon and lower part of the body. It is said that attachment is like seawater: It increases thirst instead of solving the suffering from thirst.

Anger – Anger is also the emotion of hatred and a destructive state of mind. It diminishes the peace and happiness of the self and of others. Generally anger manifests itself through pride, ambition, power, jealousy, stupidity, fear, etc. The liver, gall bladder and middle part of the body are the physical organs and areas that produce the body heat and psychological fire elements (anger) that burn happiness and freedom.

Ignorance – ‘Close Mindedness’ or lack of awareness occurs when the human being stops his ability of judgment and his mental state falls into darkness. Closed-mindedness produces doubt, fear, delusion, lack of concentration, and selfish actions. Ignorance is believed to be the root of ALL other afflictions, sufferings, and bad karma.
The head is where the sensory consciousnesses and emotions rise and dissolve. These in turn depend upon brain functions, therefore it is believed that ignorance is  manifested  from  the  brain.


At the center of The Wheel of Life: Attachment (Bird) > Anger (Snake) > Ignorance (Pig)


  • Gross Mind – Functions from the Crown chakra
    The Gross Mind resides in the brain and depends upon the mechanical duties of the brain cells to function. It is in charge of memory, sleeping,  interests, stress,  tension, sensory perception etc.
  • Subtle Mind – Emotions from the Heart chakra
    The Subtle Mind is found in the heart in energy form. Its primary function is to receive data from the Gross Mind.  The Subtle Mind allows us to feel emotions such as fear, anxiety, sadness, love, compassion, and joy. It also produces deep contemplation and dreams.
  • The Very Subtle Mind – Located in the Naval chakra
    The Very Subtle Mind receives and stores all experiences from the Gross and Subtle Minds. It is mostly inactive except during the process of dying and conception.  The Very Subtle Mind carries memories for next lives and can only otherwise be reached by deep meditation, shock, or a high spiritual realization.